Do You Know When a Supermajority is Required by the U.S. Constitution?

Here are all the instances when The Constitution requires a ⅔ majority vote.  Note that ending a filibuster is NOT on the list. 

 

A ⅔ majority vote in the Senate is required for:

  • Conviction of an Impeachment (Article 1, Section 3)
  • Ratification of a treaty (Article 2, Section 2)

A ⅔ majority vote in both the House and the Senate is required for:

 

  • Override of a Presidential Veto (Article 1, Section 7)
  • Passage of a Constitutional Amendment by Congress (Article 5)
  • Restoration of the ability of certain rebels to serve in the government (14th Amendment)
  • Approval of removal of the President from his position, after the Vice President and the Cabinet approve such removal ,and after the President contests the removal (25th Amendment)

Other circumstances in which The Constitution requires a ⅔ majority vote:

 

  • Expulsion of a member of one house of Congress requires 2/3 vote of the house in question (Article 1, Section 5)
  • Calling for a Constitutional Convention requires 2/3 of the state legislatures (Article 5)

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